Adult social care

The author of this article was diagnosed with ASD in her 40’s, and while appreciating it as a more positive label than those she’d previously received, she also struggled greatly with the subsequent non-existent support.

The assumption that we must have worked it out by now if we’re still walking, talking and have a pulse can hide a grim reality of difficult, isolated and unfulfilled lives. Sometimes someone just giving me a reality check of the “have you eaten today?” kind would be useful.

Left to my own devices, I turned to the internet, where I discovered there were others out there trying to make sense of it all too – an online tribe for the tribeless, a diaspora of aliens in a neurotypical universe.

In the long-term, diagnosis has allowed me more self-forgiveness and self-understanding and I’m much happier because of it.

But some support in reaching that place would have been useful. So would occasionally being asked: “Do you need any help?”

Buddy Bench

This lovely idea is a great way to minimise bullying and increase inclusion.  A young boy, having seen a similar idea at a school overseas, raised it with his principal and school board, who agreed to implement it.  Kids who feel lonely at recess can sit on this bench, and be invited to play or walk with others.  The website has several different strategies with which the benches can be used- Christian’s Buddy Bench.

Brisbane subsidised shared cabs

Brisbane City Council organises shared taxis at scheduled times for residents who find it difficult to get to their local shops.  To be eligible for this service, you must be over 60, mobility impaired, or a Pensioner/Senior Card holder- and you may be accompanied by a carer or a child under your care.  Costs $1-$3 each way, and covers many suburbs and shopping centres.  Looks like a very helpful scheme- may be worth asking if similar opportunities are available in other cities.

Simple description of SPD

Getting “used to it”- how SPD affects me, by The Dreamer (Totally Abnormal blog).

Since I read a lot of blog posts related to Sensory Processing Disorder (SPD), I have seen many people’s descriptions of what SPD is:

“The sensory sliders in my brain are all over the place.”

“My sensory cup is too big for some senses and too small for others.”

“Everything is multiplied for me.”

These are all good descriptions of SPD, but I wanted to think of a quick one. A simple one. One that would help people that had no prior knowledge of SPD know how oversensitivity feels.

I don’t get used to things.

Driving and AS

Driving and Asperger Syndrome (The ASC Good Practice Guide). This article, which begins towards the bottom of page 7, is very thorough! Covers difficulties likely to arise (eg dyspraxia, multi-tasking, rule application etc) and tips to help overcome them, and some tips for instructors (eg being aware of the effect of using literal language, difficulties with generalisations etc).

Kids with disabilities need to learn…

Adult with disabilities shares what kids with disabilities need to learn, by Andrew Pulrang.

What skills do children with disabilities need to become independent adults? There are plenty of transition planning guides and parenting tips to help answer this question. I would like to offer some ideas to consider, as an adult who was once a child with disabilities.

At times it may seem like independence is determined by the type and level of disability a person has, but it isn’t. People with all kinds of disabilities live independently. What they have in common is a set of key skills and habits… (very sensible and practical list!)

Judith Heumann, one of the leaders of the disability rights movement, helped define Independent Living, when she said, “Independence is not about doing things for yourself. It is about having control over how things are done.” You can be independent and in control, even if you literally can’t lift a finger or speak an audible word. You just need the right tools and supports.