Advice to parents of newly-diagnosed

Advice to parents after an autism diagnosis, by ASD Dad. A very positive list!  Includes tips like:

  • nothing about your child has changed- they can just access services and support,
  • presume competence,
  • get to know teens and adults who have autism- they have great insights,
  • let go of your expectations and live in the present,
  • remember that your love and acceptance for your child is what matters most.

Picky Eater Strategies

3 Picky Eater Strategies that Work, by Sarah Remmer. They may work for you … they may not, but they’re practical and simple, and similar to what we’ve used in feeding therapy (SOS approach by Dr Kay Toomey- Sequential Oral Sensory).

Just for interest, this post has the 32 steps to eating chart, plus some description about how it was implemented.

Presume competence, in me

Presume competence, in me (Autism Bubble blog).

I’m tired of seeing great, loving parents, who never stop looking for ways they can do better for their kids being beaten down, and feeling like they can never be who, or what their children need.

We struggle to accept compliments, or encouragement as parents without feeling obligated to be offended on our child’s behalf, when usually all the person is saying is, “Hey, you’re doing a great job, keep it up” without meaning anything derogatory about our kids, or about autism for that matter. I say that all the time to my friends with neurotypical kids, because parenting is hard, and their response is usually ‘Thank you, I really needed to hear that today.”. So why is it so wrong for us to need and accept the same validation as parents from others?

“At least your kid talks”

“At least your kid talks” (Autism with a side of fries blog).

I hear this a lot. It’s meant to check me into reality that the autism I am familiar with isn’t every one’s. I get it but here’s the thing. There’s a difference between talking and successfully communicating.

The thing I love about this post, is that it highlights that everyone struggles with something. It’s not a competition about whose struggles are harder- they’re just different struggles.

Baby Bridges and a Developmental Tracker

Baby Bridges is a free program for 0-5’s with disabilities and/or developmental delays, and their parents/carers. The standard program consists of two components: children’s play and specialised therapy sessions with qualified therapists; and parent information and training sessions. It is offered at several locations throughout Queensland, however, the location at Auchenflower (Developing Foundation) incorporates the Developing Childhood program and Funtastic Creations.

The Developing Childhood program designed by child development experts (which is available independently of Baby Bridges) is a fantastic opportunity for parents of children to track and enhance milestones from birth to a functional age of 3 – and there are 342 of them in the first three years of a child’s life!  This detailed record-keeping is invaluable for parents who may be concerned about developmental delays, to track and to share with their paediatrician or therapists.  In addition to charting milestones, the program offers a personalised program ofactivities to help stimulate and encourage your child towards their next milestones.  The site offers a one month free trial (which I highly recommend checking out!), and the full cost of the program is $95 (total).