Three upcoming events

Carers Week 2015 events – various locations, 11-17 October. My local ones sound great!

Free NDIS Community briefing with Dr Bruce Bonyhady AM, hosted by Montrose – Darra, 4 November.
A wonderful opportunity to hear from the leader and thinker behind the NDIS, Bruce Bonyhady AM.
In a relaxed atmosphere Mr Bonyhady will discuss:
Changes to the social service sector nationally
Impact the NDIS will have in Queensland
What this means for people with a disability.

Young Families Taking Charge, presented by CRU – Chermside, 10 November. This workshop is for families of young children with disability (0-8 years) who are interested in hearing about the NDIS and what they can do now to develop a vision and a plan for the future. We will talk about how families can be thoughtful about using paid supports to build a good life, how to maintain strong family and community connections, and where to start in being prepared and informed in the lead up to the NDIS.

Advice to parents of newly-diagnosed

Advice to parents after an autism diagnosis, by ASD Dad. A very positive list!  Includes tips like:

  • nothing about your child has changed- they can just access services and support,
  • presume competence,
  • get to know teens and adults who have autism- they have great insights,
  • let go of your expectations and live in the present,
  • remember that your love and acceptance for your child is what matters most.

Presume competence, in me

Presume competence, in me (Autism Bubble blog).

I’m tired of seeing great, loving parents, who never stop looking for ways they can do better for their kids being beaten down, and feeling like they can never be who, or what their children need.

We struggle to accept compliments, or encouragement as parents without feeling obligated to be offended on our child’s behalf, when usually all the person is saying is, “Hey, you’re doing a great job, keep it up” without meaning anything derogatory about our kids, or about autism for that matter. I say that all the time to my friends with neurotypical kids, because parenting is hard, and their response is usually ‘Thank you, I really needed to hear that today.”. So why is it so wrong for us to need and accept the same validation as parents from others?

Focus on positive

Reclaiming the dignity lost in a diagnosis, by Cas Faulds (We are like your child blog).

My son is autistic, and I know what it is like to sit with professionals and be told how limited your child is.  

Her recommendation: Rewrite the professional report using positive (neurodiverse) language, rather than negative/deficit (pathology) language- and she includes an example.

You are going to have to introduce your child to teachers and therapists and you’re going to have to do that more than once.  When you do, you want to do that from a place of strength rather than a place of weakness.  You want to highlight your child’s unique potential rather than place limitations on them.