Autism and SN Guides Qld and beyond

One of the incredibly resourceful ladies I’ve had the privilege of “meeting” through Facebook has put together two very indepth resource guides that she is keen for people to share wherever they would be useful.

A Resource Guide & Ideas for Therapists, Teachers, Parents and Carers working with people with Special Needs- covers a multitude of topics, and is well worth checking out.

The Queensland Autism Parents Handbook is 101 pages and is a comprehensive guide to autism services, support, tips and ideas for Qld. The book is most relevant to Qld but is a valuable source of info wherever you live.

Explanation of Low Tone

What does low tone mean?, by Starfish Therapies. Great explanation!

Muscle tone is the resting state of your muscles. When a child has low muscle tone it means that they need to put a lot more energy into getting their muscles to turn on to do what they want them to do. I often try to explain this to parents by describing that feeling when you finally get to sink into the couch or your favorite arm chair and relax and then someone calls you from the other room and you have to rev up the energy to get up. Think about having to do that every time you move because that’s what it can be like for kiddos who have low tone.

When I talk about strength being a challenge for kids with low tone I am talking about not just their ability to generate enough force to move their arm or their leg, but also their endurance and their ability to switch their muscles on and off. These components all work together to produce movement.

Toe-walking, trauma and truth

T is for Toe-walking, Trauma, and Truth-telling (Unstrange Mind blog). There’s a lot of great content in this post!  The author writes about her physical pain due to decades of toe-walking, and puts it into the same category as head-banging- something that isn’t safe and can have long-term negative effects.  She then discusses the psychological trauma of repeated correction, and the compounded trauma of lying to avoid getting reprimanded yet again.

Autism acceptance means helping, mentoring, guiding, but never trying to re-shape an Autistic person for no good reason beyond the comfort of others. If you accept Autistic people, you will accept that we often move differently, communicate differently, and think differently. Autism acceptance does not mean just letting us “go wild.” We need mentoring just like anyone else. Autism acceptance means working to understand why we do things and carefully judging before you try to change our behavior: do you want to change it to help us be healthier and happier? Or do you want to change it because you think other people will not accept us the way we are?